Rosland Disc Golf Course

Our first day in Minnesota, they had a big winter storm that dumped a few more inches of snow, travel was pretty much a joke. After the storm stopped, I asked my brother, Chris (how has lived most of his adult life in Minnesota and drives icy, slick roads all the time) to take me to the nearest disc golf course. When we got to Rosland Park Disc Golf Course it was obvious that nobody had played there today (in a long time?). The beautiful un-tracked

As you can see, the snow is a little deep here.

As you can see, the snow is a little deep here.

snow was just about mid-thigh deep, which really changes your foot work. Luckily, someone posted a course map online, which meant by squinting into my cell phone out in the blinding snow I could guess where the tee pads were. A couple of times, I actually dug down and found the concrete, but in the windy, cold I didn’t need to test my brother’s patience too far.

I only brought two discs: an overstable putter and a condor. The putter is florescent green

This is where my condor landed. It is about six inches beyond the snow disturbance.

This is where my condor landed. It is about six inches beyond the snow disturbance.

(easy to find) and being overstable I thought it would throw well in the wind, the condor is huge and blue and I thought therefore easy to find. The wind made the slightly understable condor massively understable and when it knifed into the snow, it is possible that it could have been difficult to find. I didn’t lose any discs.

This course was in a park. As there were no other park users, I just had fun. The course does play through a picnic area (why not? – I love using human beings as mobile disc golf hazards), but the design flaw is corrected by this sign:

I have always thought that  creating potential conflicts between disc golfers and other park users was extremely bad course design. Signage like this, however, makes it all OK...

I have always thought that creating potential conflicts between disc golfers and other park users was extremely bad course design. Signage like this, however, makes it all OK…

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